2017年早大法学部;英語(Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights )を読む(1)


2017年早大法学部;英語二番
[Adapted from Kenji Yoshino, Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights (2006) .]とある。
吉野健二 著 
『カバリング:私たちの市民権に対する隠れた暴行』 

Coveringの意味が判然としない。

ウィキペディアに、こうした記述を見つけた。
Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights, published in 2006 is both an analysis on society's views on race and sexuality and a collection of autobiographical anecdotes. Kenji Yoshino, the author, is the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at the NYU School of Law.[1] He wrote an article in the Yale Law Journal called Coveringin 2002, but went into more extensive detail on the subject of covering using legal manifesto and poetic memoirs.[2] The preface of the book best tells the meaning of covering:
Everyone covers. To cover is to tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream. In our diverse society, all of us are outside the mainstream in some way […] every reader of this book has covered, whether consciously or not, and sometimes at significant personal cost.[3]

この本の序文がcoveringの意味を一番わかりやすく説明している。
青文字部分の直訳:
誰もがカバーしている。カバーするとは、主流に適応するのに向いていないアイデンティティーを薄めることだ。私たちの多様な社会では、私たち誰もが何らかの形で主流からはずれている。[略] この本の読者もみな、意識的であろうとなかろうと、カバーしたことがあるし、時には個人的に大きな犠牲を払っている。

以下、問題文。


Read the passage and answer the questions below.
*(問題には、英単語の註はない)

I have come to my grandparents' house in the country after two months in a Tokyo junior high school. My parents have been heroic in their quest to preserve the Japaneseness of their two children. In America, a sheaf of yellow paper arrives each month from a correspondence school. It is homework in Japanese, which will teach us the characters we will need to read a newspaper. My parents' plan was to bring my older sister and me back to Japan each summer so we could attend school in June and July. We began at a private school called the Family School, whose mission was to assimilate returnee children like ourselves into Japanese society.

I have come to my grandparents' house in the country after two months in a Tokyo junior high school.
私が田舎にある祖父母の家にやってきたのは、東京の中学校に通い始めて2か月後のことだった。
My parents have been heroic in their quest to preserve the Japaneseness of their two children.
私の両親は2人の子供が日本人らしさを身につけるよう、思い切った手を打っていた。
In America, a sheaf of yellow paper arrives each month from a correspondence school.
アメリカにいるときには、通信教育学校から毎月、黄色い紙の束が送ってくる。
It is homework in Japanese, which will teach us the characters we will need to read a newspaper.
それは日本語の課題だ。これがきっと日本の新聞を読むために必要な漢字を子供たちに教えてくれるはずだ。
My parents' plan was to bring my older sister and me back to Japan each summer so we could attend school in June and July.
両親の計画は、毎年夏には姉と私を日本に帰して、6・7月だけ学校に通わせることだった。
We began at a private school called the Family School, whose mission was to assimilate returnee children like ourselves into Japanese society.初めて入ったのはファミリースクールという私立学校だったが、この学校の使命は、私たちのような帰国子女を日本社会にとけ込ませる(同化)ことだった。

When I was in fifth grade, my parents decided the Family School was inadequate. How could we learn to be Japanese from returnee children? They enrolled us in an ordinary Tokyo public school. Perhaps my allergy to assimilation began at Higashiyama School, in Matsumoto-sensei's fifth-grade classroom. The class had a darling. When she stood to answer a question, the other girls would croon, "Kawaiiiiiii." The class also had a pariah, a stoop-shouldered mumbler. He would elicit the cry, "Kuraiiiii." Matsumoto-sensei smiled benignly at these rituals. It was good to come to a consensus.

When I was in fifth grade, my parents decided the Family School was inadequate.
私が5年生のとき、両親は、ファミリースクールではダメだという結論に達した。
How could we learn to be Japanese from returnee children?
一体、どうすれば、帰国子女から日本人になることを学べるというのだろうか。
They enrolled us in an ordinary Tokyo public school.
両親は私たちを東京にある普通の公立学校に入れた。
Perhaps my allergy to assimilation began at Higashiyama School, in Matsumoto-sensei's fifth-grade classroom.
たぶん、私の同化アレルギーは、東山小学校の、松本先生の5年生教室で始まった。
The class had a darling.
クラスには人気者がいた。
When she stood to answer a question, the other girls would croon, "Kawaiiiiiii."
その子が立って質問に答えると、他の女の子たちは一斉に「かわいー」とささやく。
The class also had a pariah, a stoop-shouldered mumbler.
クラスには、パーリア、猫背のぶつぶつ屋もいた。
He would elicit the cry, "Kuraiiiii."
この男子だけがいつも「くらいー(訳者:よくわからない?)」と叫んで応戦していた。
Matsumoto-sensei smiled benignly at these rituals.
松本先生はこうした行事をいつも優しくほほ笑んで見ていた。
It was good to come to a consensus.
意見の一致が望ましいことだった。


The Japan scholar Edwin Reischauer once compared the Japanese to a school of fish, darting one way together, then, if startled, darting the other, but always in synchronicity. I have seen such fish in the Boston aquarium and have seen them move together as if each fish were a single scale on one larger fish. I have looked to see if there was a single fish out of place, and have realized that if I cannot find that fish, it may be because I am it.
日本の研究者エドウィン・ライシャワーはかつて日本人を魚の群れにたとえている。(魚の群れは)みな同じ方向に突進し、驚かされると今度はそろって反対方向に突進するからだ。私はそんな魚をボストン水族館で見たことがある。まるでそれぞれの魚が大きな魚の一枚一枚のうろこのように、一つになって行動するのを見たことがある。私は仲間外れになる魚が1匹ぐらいはいるのではないかと注意して見た。そして、そういう魚を見つけられないとしたら、それは私がその魚だからなのかもしれないと思った。

My parents emphasized that the grades on my Japanese report cards were unimportant-this was an education in becoming Japanese. Becoming Japanese required an ability to read my social situation. And this I could not do. I clumped indoors with my outdoor shoes or called a student in the grade above me by her first name. □1(ここに適する文をA~Dより選ぶ)
両親はいつも言っていたのは、日本の通知表の成績は重要ではないこと、これは日本人になるための教育なのだということだった。日本人になるには、私がおかれている社会的立場を読みとる能力が必要だった。もちろん、こんなことを私にできるわけがなかった。私は土足で室内を歩き回ったり、学年の先輩を名字でなく名前で呼んだりしていたのだから。□1

A Consequently, I learned to behave correctly and eventually became Japanese.
B Despite my failures, I was becoming Japanese.
C I focused on excelling at school in America to make up for my poor grades in Japan.
→D I passed Japanese language but failed Japanese culture.
E The more fluent my Japanese became, however, the more I began to behave Japanese.


My sister who has settled down in Tokyo, on the other hand, has gone so native that the Japanese *compliment her English. I used to marvel at how she passed as Japanese until one day in college I watched her answer the telephone with Japanese mannerisms and realized she was no longer passing. She was Japanese. In Japan, perceptions of an individual's race do not rest on biology alone.Both my sister and I have the blood and skin of the Japanese. Yet while these biological traits were necessary to our status as "true Japanese," they were not sufficient. Our race was also defined by our behaviors.
*complement,補足する compliment褒める

一方,姉は東京に慣れて、すっかり日本人のようになっていた。周囲の日本人が彼女の英語をほめるほどである。姉が日本人として通用するようになったことに驚いたものだ。しかし、ある日、私は大学で彼女が日本人のように電話で話しているのを見て、彼女はもう通用しているというレヴェルではないことを実感した。彼女は日本人だった。日本では、個人の人種の認知(人が何人であるか)は,生物学だけで決まるわけではない。姉も私も日本人の血と皮膚の色を持っている。それでもこれらの生物学的特徴は、私たちが「真の日本人」としての地位(=認定条件)にとっては必要ではあるが、それだけでは十分ではない。わが民族には振舞い方(によっても定義された)も重要な要素だった。


| 上北沢・哲英会(個人塾)連絡用ブログ ホーム |

▲TOPへ